The Three Cs of Faculty Well-Being: Connection, Culture, and Competence

“When we’re thinking about the definition of faculty well-being, that is really deeply connected to faculty members’ job satisfaction,” said ACUE’s Chief Data Officer Meghan Snow.

In the Faculty Well-Being and Engagement webinar hosted by the American Council on Education (ACE), Dr. Snow shared three primary contributors to job satisfaction:

  • Connection with colleagues, students, and administrators
  • Perceptions of climate and culture
  • Feelings of competence

Survey data show that faculty members who engage in ACUE’s courses feel more connected with their colleagues, are more enthusiastic about their teaching, and benefit from increased confidence in their ability to teach effectively.

View the clips below to hear from administrators and faculty about how engaging in ACUE’s courses has impacted their sense of job satisfaction and well-being on campus.

Connection

Culture

Competence

Did engaging in an ACUE course contribute to your sense of connection, perceptions of institutional culture, and teaching competence? We’d love to hear from you! 

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